Age Changes How People Engage in Online, TV News Sources, Reuters Report Finds

Photo via Flickr creative commons Jason Howie (CC BY 2.0)

Age makes a difference with how people engage with online and television news sources.

Younger generations consume more online news, while older generations consume more television news, according to a Reuters Institute Digital News Report released last week.

Half of the entire sample of the report said that they use social media as a source of news every week, with 12% saying that it is their main source. Facebook is the most important network for news consumption, the report said.

However, many consumers in English-speaking countries are reluctant to pay for general news online, with only 9% of them saying they would pay for news. In smaller countries, with different languages, people are twice as likely to pay.

This has created an obvious disruption in the amount of publications that can sustain themselves financially. “Driving revenues” has become the most critical issue for publishers.

“It’s hard to know how far — or how fast — the shift to distributed media will go, but this feels like the beginning of a new phase of media disruption. News organizations will need to keep adapting to changes ahead — while recognizing that journalistic track record, trust and brand equity will remain necessary if not sufficient ingredients of success,” the report said.

Mobile app development and social media has been large factors in the shift to how people consume news. An infographic from Statista, which took its data from Nomura Research, found that Facebook, Snapchat — which shows video from CNN, ESPN, Fox News and other news outlets — and Instagram are among the highest used social media platforms.

Age makes a difference with how people engage with online and television news sources.

Younger generations consume more online news, while older generations consume more television news, according to a Reuters Institute Digital News Report released last week.

Half of the entire sample of the report said that they use social media as a source of news every week, with 12% saying that it is their main source. Facebook is the most important network for news consumption, the report said.

However, many consumers in English-speaking countries are reluctant to pay for general news online, with only 9% of them saying they would pay for news. In smaller countries, with different languages, people are twice as likely to pay.

This has created an obvious disruption in the amount of publications that can sustain themselves financially. “Driving revenues” has become the most critical issue for publishers.

“It’s hard to know how far — or how fast — the shift to distributed media will go, but this feels like the beginning of a new phase of media disruption. News organizations will need to keep adapting to changes ahead — while recognizing that journalistic track record, trust and brand equity will remain necessary if not sufficient ingredients of success,” the report said.

Mobile app development and social media has been large factors in the shift to how people consume news. An infographic from Statista, which took its data from Nomura Research, found that Facebook, Snapchat — which shows video from CNN, ESPN, Fox News and other news outlets — and Instagram are among the highest used social media platforms.

Downloads for WhatsApp, Messenger and Facebook exceeded 35 million downloads in May, outpacing 8.3 million for Twitter, which just a few years ago outpaced Facebook as the main source for news online in terms of users.

06/21/2016 8:55 AM by Chris Cruz

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